DOCTOR COOL HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING    205-478-2294     MATT@DRCOOLBHAM.COM

HOW HEAT PUMPS WORK

HOW CENTRAL HEATING WORKS

HOW AIR CONDITIONING WORKS

Heat pumps are used for either the heating or cooling of your home by transferring heat between the indoors and the outdoors. Because heat pump systems transfer heat rather than generating it, they are more energy efficient.
In the warmer months, the heat pump acts like an air conditioner, removing heat from the air inside your home and transferring it outside.
During colder months, the opposite is true, as the heat from outdoor air is extracted and transferred to the interior of your home. Believe it or not, even a 32 degree Fahrenheit day produces enough heat to warm a home using a heat pump.
A typical heat pump consists of an outdoor unit similar to a central air conditioning system and an indoor unit called an air handler. A compressor pumps refrigerant (also known as freon, R22 or R410A) that absorbs and releases heat as it travels between the indoor and outdoor units.
Heat pumps are best for moderate climates, keeping homes warm even when temperatures drop into the low 20s. A supplemental heating source may be needed for lower temperatures. 

Central heating systems have a primary heating appliance, such as a furnace, typically located in your basement or attic. All furnaces consist of four main components: 1) burners that deliver and burn fuel, 2) heat exchangers, 3) a blower and 4) a flue that acts as an exhaust for gaseous by-products. Depending on your situation, region and needs, you can choose from heating systems running on either gas or oil as fuel, or a hybrid packaged system that can use both fuel types.

HOW IT WORKS?

Combustion gases are generated by the burners in your furnace and passed over a heat exchanger. Air from your home blows across the heat exchanger to be warmed. It is then blown through a system of ducts to distribute around your home.

During warm seasons your heating system works with your central air conditioning. Air is cooled as it’s blown over your air conditioning unit’s cooling coil, often attached to the exhaust of the furnace, and then sent over the same air ducts throughout your home. An independent dealer can help you decide which central cooling and heating system is right for you. Matched brand systems can be customized with cooling and heating units that match your situation and let you choose from a range of energy efficiency.

WHAT IT IS? The most common central cooling system is a split system, which includes an outdoor cabinet containing a condenser coil and compressor, and an indoor evaporator coil, usually installed in conjunction with your furnace or air handler. The compressor pumps a chemical called refrigerant through the system.

HOW IT WORKS? The warm air inside your home blows across the indoor evaporator coil and the heat energy from the air transfers to the refrigerant inside the coil. Think of the refrigerant like a sponge, absorbing the heat from the air. As a result, the air is now “cool”. The cooler air is circulated back through the home providing comfort. The refrigerant is pumped back to the compressor where the heat absorbed by the refrigerant is released and cycle begins again. Moisture that contributes to humidity is also condensed out of the air.

Your cooling system is usually combined with your central heating system because they share the same ductwork for distributing conditioned air throughout your home.

FACTS:

The typical central air conditioning system is a split system, with an outdoor air conditioning, or "compressor bearing unit" and an indoor coil, which is usually installed on top of the furnace in the home.

Using electricity as its power source, the compressor pumps refrigerant through the system to gather heat and moisture from indoors and remove it from the home.

Heat and moisture are removed from the home when warm air from inside the home is blown over the cooled indoor coil. The heat in the air transfers to the coil, thereby "cooling" the air.

The heat that has transferred to the coil is then "pumped" to the exterior of the home, while the cooled air is pumped back inside, helping to maintain a comfortable indoor temperature.

Central air conditioning can also be provided through a package unit or a heat pump.